PUCH 250 SGS

Restoring a barn-fresh 1966 Sears Allstate

it all went black

In my mania to get the bike together for the CVMG rally, I’ve sprayed the nacelle, chain guard and fender with Tremclad.  The nacelle is in the bbq as I type, the toddler is in her bed trying not to nap, and the baby is on the floor chewing whatever she can get her hands on…

hold the sauce

hold the sauce

On previous projects I’ve gone all out and sprayed professional primer, base and clear, the biggest challenge has always been dust, dust, dust but clear-coat is pretty forgiving and can be sanded and polished. This is my first attempt at shooting Tremclad for a nice finish. The paint is on old can of Tremclad (Canadian name, it’s Rustoleum in the US) It is a tough rust paint (as the name suggests).

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In the spray booth, ran out of grey primer, had to run out and get some...

I thinned the paint with Laquer Thinner (a quick drying solvent), and sprayed it with a compressor/gun, it does come in rattle cans too. I painted my trailer with it and I remember it taking forever to dry, like a week. IMG_0225_fender_primeI’ve used 2 part professional auto paints previously but for this I just wanted it black and shiny, I was also in a rush so into the bbq it goes. I read somewhere that a good bake at 300° will set it up, and it did do the trick. I was worried that it might create problems with the body filler and primer, but nope, all good. I let it dry for about 2 hours so it was just tacky to the touch, then I gave it a cook, my deep fry/candy thermometer read about 280°so I thought it would be safe. As there is no chemical reaction happening, just the evaporation of solvents I figure a bake is just expediting the process; someone commented on a forum that baking might interfere with the rate and order in which the solvents evaporate, I figure if it doesn’t wrinkle, then it’s ok. A funny thing has happened, the longer I stare at my neglected, rusty, corroded and oxidized motorcycle, the more I like it that way. Paul,  from the outset, insisted I should just give it the “oily rag” finish, I was bent on sandblasting my way to Germanic perfection. Now Malcolm is urging me to just leave it alone too. The problem is, I’ve made a shiny spot or two and now I’m at a crossroads. Do I continue making shiny parts, or beat up the new stuff to look old..?

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Got some bubbling from a few spots of spot filler that didn’t dry long enough, but for this bike at this stage it is certianly good enough. Don’t be fooled the photos look great but there is lots of dust, some spits and bumps in it, but overall I am really happy with my cheap and cheerful paint job.

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There are a few dips, dots and the bottom edge is a bit ragged from chipping that I didn’t chase after…

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bondo, primer, fender, nacelle

IMG_0003_nacelle

filled and primed

At long last I am actually doing some real work on my ’68 Puch 250 SGS. I replaced the oil in the tank with some TC-W3, and I think I’ve burnt off  all the old 10-w30 that was lingering in the system, much less smoky now.

I’ve fitted the choke plate and it works great, the bike is a 2-3 kick start; replaced the lower bolt on the chain guard (flowed the brazing to remove the old bold, re-brazed a new one on; filled holes and primed the nacelle; repaired a crack in the fender, banged out a few of the dents, and slathered on a liberal coat of Bondo.

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removed a rusted/crumpled section out of the headlight edge.

I initially experimented with trying to stick weld the sheet metal, I know it can be done, but it is out of my skill range and I don’t have the time to practice. I did fill one hole on the nacelle  but opted to brass braze the others as it is faster and well within my skill range.

It is hard to articulate just how badly dented the front fender is, it resembles a sheet of paper that has been crumpled and smoothed out again, the shape is there more or less, just very lumpy. This can be seen in the picture where I ground off the paint before the resin filler. I’m using a quick-set filler, must say I love it, really speeds up the fill/ sand cycles.

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first round of triage

The fender will make a thud sound when finished rather then the nice ringing ding of an all steel fender. I suppose I could buy a less abused fender off ebay, but that wouldn’t be quite right.

IMG_0030_fender_braze

Brazing the crack.

posted by Fastback in mechanical,restoration and have Comments (2)